Scott Marlowe, fantasy author

Scott Marlowe

Author of the Alchemancer and Assassin Without a Name fantasy series

Some thoughts on The Goddard Affair

This first appeared in the From the Author section on Amazon’s product page for The Goddard Affair.

Unlike the previous installment in the series, Night of Zealotry, where the title character's prowess as an assassin is on full display, The Goddard Affair allowed me to showcase his charm and ability to blend into almost any situation. In this case, it's a high society gala event, put on by the Society for the Progression of Science & Technology. The Progressive Society was loosely modeled after the famed Royal Society of London. The governing bodies and other nuances are different, but the goal of furthering science and the general understanding of it are the same.

The Goddard Affair finds our witty assassin in the thick of things once more, but this time amidst more pleasant company a la Gwendolyn Morgan, a society member who's gotten herself into a bit of a predicament. Needless to say, the Assassin Without a Name lends her his particular skills. Readers of mine know my female characters are anything but damsels in distress, though I won't say anything more lest I introduce spoilers.

I will, however, say this: The Goddard Affair is the longest story in the series to date and it was, without a doubt, the most fun. It brings in a lot of different elements: action, intrigue, mystery, murder, technology, and, of course, mayhem. I gave a lot of thought to many of the characters because you're definitely going to see more of some of them as the larger story continues to come to light.

It's a fun series to write, so as long as readers continue to enjoy the stories, I'll keep writing them.

Thief’s Gambit, the fifth Assassin Without a Name story, is now available as a pre-order at Amazon!

Some thoughts on Killing the Dead (Assassin Without a Name #2)

This first appeared in the From the Author section on Amazon’s product page for Killing the Dead.

I like necromancy. Not personally, but as an author. The myriad kinds of undead have always fascinated me, which is probably why I'm such a big fan of H.P. Lovecraft and August Derleth. Killing the Dead, however, is not horror, so even though it deals with necromancy, the story explores it from a fantasy perspective. In fact, I'd even go so far as to say (without spoilers) that the story remains firmly grounded, something which I think made for a much more satisfying story.

Much like Fine Wine, Killing the Dead was a lot of fun to write. It's longer than the first one in the series (each story so far gets a little bit longer) and has a more developed plot. You get a bit of a glimpse into our main character's psyche, as he wonders about redemption, and a broader view of Alchester, the city where the series takes place. Also like the first story in the series, Killing the Dead mostly serves as an introduction to the title character, while telling a fun story along the way.

If you enjoy a fun read about assassins, graveyards, and necromancers that you can easily finish in a sitting, then I think you'll like Killing the Dead.

Thief’s Gambit, the fifth Assassin Without a Name story, is now available as a pre-order at Amazon!

Some thoughts on Fine Wine (Assassin Without a Name #1)

This first appeared in the From the Author section on Amazon’s product page for Fine Wine.

Like any story, Fine Wine started with a simple idea: an assassin makes a deal. The story was a bit of an experiment, as I wanted to see if I could write something short. Like really, really short, while still telling a complete story. You see, I'd tried this in the past; every effort turned into a much longer work than what I had originally anticipated. Fine Wine, however, went as planned, taking all of an hour or so to get the first draft down.

In the process of writing the story I discovered a character I liked enough to want to revisit. So I wrote Killing the Dead, which was planned as a longer, more involved story meant to reveal a bit more about the character and the world he lives in. With the first two tales forming a base for the character, I decided to expand the series by introducing additional supporting characters, a number of organizations whose motives our witty assassin finds himself opposed to for one reason or another, and a diabolical plan which just might mean the end of everything the Assassin Without a Name holds dear. This larger direction starts with Night of Zealotry and continues into subsequent stories from there.

Each story is a tale unto itself, however, so no cliffhanger endings. While I want readers to come back for the next story, I also want them to leave with a sense of fulfillment. I know how some readers feel about serial style works; rest assured, the Assassin Without a Name series is not a collection of serials, but actual short stories and novellas, each with its own beginning and end.