Scott Marlowe, fantasy author

Scott Marlowe

Author of the Alchemancer and Assassin Without a Name fantasy series

What This Site Is About, or Where I'm at in My Writing

This site is about my writing, of course, and my attempt to get published.

The short of it is that It remains a work-in-progress. The long of it? I'm about 65 pages into editing my second book.

This is just the first run-through. The goal at this point is really just general clean-up: tie-up any loose ends I left dangling, clean things up, make sure everything is whole and consistent, and, most important of all, hack and slash anything--anything!!!--that doesn't fit into the main storyline. It's all well and fine to have sub-stories or other plot devices that help build your characters up, but I've got a 135,000 word monster on my hands and, as a new writer, I help my chances of getting published by lessening the door-stop quality.

Anyone differ on that assessment?

The second and subsequent revisions will refine some of those points but it really becomes an iterative (or repetitive?) process at that point as I work closer towards a finished product.

Need to finish up some work, then I'm out of here. Have a good weekend, everyone.

Response Times: Why do we put up with them?

253955_6684 (Large)

So I go to check my email the other day and what do I find at the top of the list but an email from Baen Books. It took me a few seconds to figure out what it was all about. Then I remembered: about a year ago, I sent them a copy of the The Hall of the Wood for review; the email was a rejection of my novel. I think their guidelines mention "about a year" on their response times, so give them points for sticking to that. But it was still a bit of a shock to (finally) get a response back, especially since I'd forgotten I'd even sent my novel to them!

I wonder: why do we put up with such lengthy response times?

The easy answer is because we have to if we want to see our work in print. It's just one of the realities of the publishing industry.

The long answer is that we really don't have to put up with it at all. There are other mediums in which to publish our work: self-publish, POD, Amazon Kindle, our own web sites or blogs, our MySpace page, Facebook, lulu.com... the list goes on.

But this approach lacks something: validation. Anyone can write. Anyone can think their writing is good. But to have someone else read our "stuff" and approve... that's what we're striving towards. That's the golden apple. Not to mention we get something else that's critical to the success of our writing success: the marketing and resources of a "real" publisher. Now, maybe money isn't important to you, but for those of us who have hopes of someday doing the writing thing full-time, it's paramount.

So we put up with publishers' response times. Fortunately, most are much quicker than Baen's one year.