Scott Marlowe, fantasy author

Scott Marlowe

Author of the Alchemancer and Assassin Without a Name fantasy series

Wordnik Word of the Day: Noctilucent

I thought as I received notable words from Wordnik's Word of the Day service, I'd post them here. If you like, sign-up for Wordnik's Word of the Day service yourself.

noctilucent

(adj) Shining by night or in the dark; nuctilucid; used especially of certain clouds.

'Noctilucent' is made of the Latin 'nocturnus,' belonging to the night, and 'lucere,' to shine.

The Wordnik Word of the Day for December 30, 2010

I thought as I received notable words from Wordnik's Word of the Day service, I'd post them here. Here's today's. If you like, sign-up for Wordnik's Word of the Day service yourself.

pelter

(noun) A shower of missiles; a storm, as of falling rain, hailstones, etc.

(noun) A passion; a fit of anger.

(noun) A dealer in skins or hides; a skinner.

(noun) A mean, sordid person; a pinchpenny; a skinflint.

(noun) In poker, a hand which has no card higher than a nine and no chance for a flush or straight: sometimes called Chicago pelter. Also, kilter.

The 'skin' meaning of 'pelter' comes from the Latin 'pellis,' skin, while the 'strike' sense comes from the Latin 'pulsare,' to beat.

Example:

"Colonel Boone had but to hear him out and bare his shoulders for such other blows which Judge Wright sought to pelter him, and we will hear with what blow he was driven from his post as Indian Agent."

The Wordnik Word of the Day for December 16, 2010

I thought as I came across notable words from Wordnik's Word of the Day service, I'd post them here. Here's today's. If you like, sign-up for Wordnik's Word of the Day service yourself.

This is the kind of word I could see myself using in a scene involving dwarven sappers. A bit out of context, I know, but I still like the conjunction of words and see potential here.

go-devil

(noun) A device for exploding a dynamite cartridge in an oil-well.

(noun) A movable-jointed contractible apparatus, with interior springs secured to iron plates in overlapping sections, something like an elongated cartridge in shape and about three feet long, introduced into a pipe-line for the purpose of freeing it from obstructions.

(noun) A rough sled used for holding one end of a log in hauling it out of the woods, etc., the other end dragging on the snow or ice.

A 'go-devil' is also known as a 'tieboy' or 'travois.'

Example:

"Gordon had laid several hundred yards of light rails upon his grade, and on these he had mounted a device in the nature of a 'go-devil' or skip, which he shunted back and forth by means of a donkey-engine and steel cable."

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The Wordnik Word of the Day for October 27, 2010

I thought as I came across notable words from Wordnik's Word of the Day service, I'd post them here. Here's today's.

The Wordnik Word of the Day for October 27, 2010 is

lamia

(noun) An enticing witch, who charmed children and youths for the purpose of feeding on their blood and flesh, like the later vampire; a female demon; hence, in general, a destroying witch or hag.

'Lamia' means literally in Greek 'swallower, lecher,' and comes from 'laimos,' meaning throat, gullet.

Example:

"It was not very long, however, before a lamia came under the tree and called out: 'Letiko, Letiko, come down and see what beautiful shoes I have on.'"

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The Wordnik Word of the Day for October 13, 2010

I thought as I came across notable words from Wordnik's Word of the Day service, I'd post them here. Here's today's. 

(Not planning on making this a daily thing, but this one was too good to pass up.) 

The Wordnik Word of the Day for October 13, 2010 is

springal

(noun) A military engine, resembling the ballista, used in Europe in the middle ages.

(noun) A young person; a youth; especially, a young man.

'Springal' is Scottish in origin.

Example:

"Philemon was used to confess how, in the fire of his callow youth and fine flower of his lustie springal days, he had been stung with murderous frenzie at view of a certaine picture of Apelles, the which in those times was showed in a temple."

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